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THE FRAGILE GIANT

There is an inseparable negotiation between the physical forces of the universe and the biological body. The outcome settles on formulations that sustain life functions of an organism. Once the world of limitations dictated by the environment alters, as a result there comes a period of adaptation and unfortunate failures. The human dream of space colonisation is bound by physiological systems. When thrown out of the equilibrium a race of evolutionary adaptation begins.

 

The project emerged from a collaborative exchange with the Synthetic Anatomy group from King’s College. It is conceptually grounded in the research on the plausible impact of Mars’s gravity on the human body. The red planet has 38% of that of Earth. It is predicted that over time the size of a human body would increase while the bone density would decrease.  

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WAX DETAIL II

WAX DETAIL I

2.5 M GLASS WAX SCULPTURE

As the forces of gravity ossify imprinted in wax, the hand that channels its flow feels the weight of cosmological rules directing the patterns. 

MARS by NASA

photo credits: Johann Spindler

IMMERSIVE INSTALATION

sand dunes animated to highlight the instability of the formation

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2021 JUN

The Fragile Giant is a fantom of the interplanetary travel, a transient piece made with glass wax. The material is extremely frail and unforgiving. It immediately breaks when touched. The sculpture takes over a month to make and following two weeks to install. It crushes every time it’s handled and requires retouching. Over time the sculpture bends and shifts under gravity. The process uses the transformative forces that come from the core of the Earth to represent the relationship between the scale of the planet and the human body. 

2021 BEEP BEEP SHOW

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2021 JULY

Frail glass wax torso sealed in silicone. The protective layer allowed for a tactile experience of the piece -the visitors were invited to touch it. Showcased during the 2021 “BEEP BEEP — The end of the end of the world” show.

physical experiments

photo credits: Johann Spindler,  Danni Zheng        

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THE DIGITAL EXPERIENCE